Uganda's Super League: Clubs Too Must Clean Up
Sports Club Villa celebrate Nile Special Super League triumph in 2003.
Image Source: SC Villa Web Site

Uganda's Super League: Clubs Too Must Clean Up


The national football league kicks, the Super League, off this weekend, with a bit of hope that it will be a better foot balling showpiece compared to the past two or so years.

By Lambert Rusoke
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First published: January 26, 2006


Those who were privileged to dine with the various corporates will agree with me that FUFA was fulfilling part of what the scriptures say, that, “by their fruits, we shall know them.”


FUFA’s strategies to bring the football back to the field could lack implementing touches if the clubs, which form the football league, aren’t upright. At least a major step has been achieved by Super Division Clubs Association (SDCA) giving in to FUFA’s directive to have a new executive in place. But my worry still lies with the individual administrations of the respective clubs.

As we await the best terms and conditions for the sponsor of the league, there was also mention that this time, clubs will be allowed to woe their own sponsors. Now this is a tricky one. Most possible sponsors had distanced themselves from the football circles. This is partly because of the clubs’ incompetence together with that of FUFA’s over the past few years. Talk of vices like match fixing, fans disagreeing with the club executives, leading to wrangles in between, in the end leaving the players cursing, and setting the way for deserters. This kind of situation cannot easily attract one to liking the game and club at that.

When Police FC won the league last year (never mind the format), their victory was accorded to a season of organization, good coaching, discipline and support by the police institution. SC Villa’s success over the years was more like due to the same. It wasn’t a surprise that in an interview with the Monitor recently, Timothy Batabaire was at no task in pointing out Police FC, as his dream initial destiny for his younger brother at Makerere University Business School. It’s because, according to him, this team is better organized.

This is the same when it comes to attracting sponsorship. For a company to decide to sponsor a particular team, they expects a lot from the team, as this would be one of their ways of promoting their brand name. It is this responsibility shouldered by the sponsors that forces the company’s management into critical screening of the clubs’ structures before they decide on their team.

Now that FUFA has set the pace to woe back sponsors to the game, clubs should only borrow a leaf, by cleaning up their houses. For it’s an added advantage for a club to have its own sponsor as well.

To the concerned parties- the ball is in your courts.

By Lambert Rusoke
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First published: January 26, 2006
Lambert Rusoke is a student at Makerere University Business School.
rlamptey2003@yahoo.com.