Itís Beginning to Feel a Lot Like Christmas

Itís Beginning to Feel a Lot Like Christmas


Lambert reflects over Christmas and tries to regain his holiday spirit.

By Lambert Rusoke
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First published: December 10, 2005


I took a walk in town one Sunday evening and just as I sloped down Colville Street, I heard sweet voices coming from inside Christ the King church. These lured me into getting inside the church and what welcomed me was the Evangelical Choir of Christ The King, presenting their annual Christmas carols. It was at this juncture that it came to mind that Christmas is just days away. I was disappointed at myself for not being in the Christmas spirit yet. In my tender young schools days the case would have been different as I would start counting down to Christmas right from the first day of reporting to school for third term.


So what happened to this childhood steam?

Ever since we were born, the birth of Jesus has really been built into our hearts, especially for those who grew up in Christian families. This was because whatever good thing was lacking at home, it would be provided at the birthday of Jesus. To many of us back then, the day meant eating rice and chicken and drinking so many bottles of soda. I remember eating to the full that even our bellies would sprout out and would head to the compound to jump around so that the food would go down. Before that it was walking down the forests to look for Christmas trees.

What about the procession to church where everyone would love to being noticed by the congregation in his new suit or her new dress? These were the times to advocate spending Christmas in the village with the grandparents, and all those relatives that you could meet once in as many years.

Travelling from the urban areas to the village on the eve of the big day in daddy's four-wheel car was very exciting. That was then and being young and dependent sowed all those benefits.

How times change. As one grows, he has to realise that things were more exciting because they were being provided for. The youth have lost the zeal to spend the big day with the grannies. At least foregoing the hiked transport fares to staying around the city and go places partying, would sound better. All your brothers and sisters, whose company used to decorate the day, are now grown up, with families of their own to spend Christmas with.

The good thing though is that, Christmas is about giving and receiving. If you are working your family expects you to give back some of your earnings. The parents expect to receive the fruits of the seeds they sowed while you were young on no other day than Christmas. Your little brother expects a pair of shoes and your little sister needs that shinning dress. Think about it, isn't it a blessing to give than to receive?

As for me the Evangelical choir ballads on that one Sunday, have sprouted up my anxiety for Christmas. Even the university calendar suggests that as we break off for Christmas, we shall be through with the exams. No better time to celebrate and revive those childhood memories than these days.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

By Lambert Rusoke
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First published: December 10, 2005
Lambert Rusoke is a student at Makerere University Business School.
rlamptey2003@yahoo.com.