Not in America

Not in America


Hurricane Katrina Devastates the American Gulf Coast

By UGPulse
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First published: September 2, 2005


Over 1,000 people are feared dead and the city of New Orleans, known of its Jazz music, great food and strong cultural history, is in shambles. The Governor of Louisiana has declared a State of Emergency.


Days after corpses floated in the streets turned into canals by the devastating hurricane, bodies lay abandoned in the drying water and in ditches on the sides of streets. About 15,000 to 20, 000 people who took shelter at the Superdome, the city's football stadium, remain homeless and with little food and medical supplies.

To make matters worse, the city has descended into a state of lawlessness with people looting not only for food but also for luxury goods. There have also been reports of fights, rapes, car jackings and an unidentified person even shot at one of the Chinook helicopters flying over the city to rescue the storm's victims.

President Bush has called the disaster one of the worst in U.S. history and a $10 billion recovery bill is making its way through congress. He has also asked his father and Bill Clinton to lead the national relief effort.

Some 14,000 national guardsmen have also been promised to the city to help in the relief effort and to maintain law and order. Authorities have also begun bus evacuations of the city's victims from the Superdome to the Astrodome, a similar football stadium in Houston.

Outside of New Orleans several towns have also been affected. In fact, in nearby Mississippi, where the death toll is much lower at 126, almost the entire town of Waveland has been flattened, flooded and destroyed. There are many others like it.

President Bush, who will be touring the disaster region today, has called on Americans to limit their consumption of gas. He said the storm's aftermath might affect oil prices.

"Don't buy gas if you don't need it," the president said.





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By UGPulse
more from author >>
First published: September 2, 2005
UGPulse Staff.