Letters: GULU WALK DC REPORT
During the Walk: A stop at the State Department.

Letters: GULU WALK DC REPORT


"Thank You!"

By Mary Kiganda
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First published: October 27, 2006


I want to start by thanking all of you who supported Impact Gulu Walk DC through donations and prayers. Thank you for making a difference one person and one day at a time. It is not too late to support this very worthwhile cause so if you wish to make a donation to Gulu Walk please go to the following link:
www.guluwalk.com/donate


Gulu Walk Washington, DC As for the Walk, God blessed us with a beautiful day and we had a very good turn out. We were also pleased to meet Ms. Betty Bigombe who has been at the forefront of fighting for peace in Northern Uganda by encouraging negotiations between the government and the LRA. (Read More).

Gulu Walk Washington, DC It was also good to see a representative of the Ugandan government, Deputy Ambassador to the US, Mr. Ssentongo along with a handful of fellow Ugandans with our Kenyan neighbors doing what they could to stand in solidarity with the suffering people of Northern Uganda. As we marched from John Marshall Park past the White House and past the State Department many of us got an opportunity to talk to each other. A Kenyan sister wondered where the rest of the Ugandans were and how come only one responded to her call for financial support for the Walk. The few Ugandans there pondered the many reasons for the poor representation from our fellow brothers and sisters. Maybe many were still struggling with forgiving the worst and most horrific leaders that had come from Northern Uganda decades ago and didn't feel they owed anyone from the North any sympathy. Then again, maybe others really were not aware of just how bad the situation was in this part of their country since they'd been enjoying peace in their own. What about those who just didn't care because this didn't concern them. Then there could be those who did care deeply but felt that by themselves they could do nothing and only a Betty Bigombe could make a difference.

Whatever our speculations, only those who do not support their causes know their reasons but we have hope that we will all soon come to see that our neighbor's problem is our problem. As one very wise Ugandan pointed out, we should start caring about what has been happening in Northern Uganda because that is where the future leaders of Uganda may come from. If a child that has grown up in the midst of violence, fear, uncertainty and insecurity becomes the future leader of Uganda, why should we be surprised that he/she will lead a country with a violent hand.

This applies not only in Uganda but in Sudan and elsewhere in Africa and in the world where violence has become a normal part of life. We have to become more like Americans in this aspect. Many of them have learned the power in reaching out to their fellow neighbor and trying to make a difference. Gulu Walk DC was organized by young American adults who really have nothing to directly gain by seeking peace for our people. Many were college kids and some had even been to Nothern Uganda. The passion with which they chanted along the Walk and stopped passers-by to explain the plight of the "night children" was awe-inspiring!

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By Mary Kiganda
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First published: October 27, 2006
Mary Kiganda is a UGPulse visitor from Washington, DC.

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