The Long Road to Makerere
Students of Memorial School of Uganda Martyrs Namugongo

The Long Road to Makerere


Most universities and other tertiary institutions are getting the new academic year underway. As Makerere gets in latest influx of students, Lambert briefly thinks about the journeys they took to get there. Do any of you have experiences to share on how you made it to the hill... or the agony of not getting there?

Please share with us and discuss the article at the Emboozi forums.

By Lambert Rusoke
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First published: September 16, 2005


The long queues that characterized the environment at Makerere University, as students from every corners of the country applied for admission forms, is really a testimony that education is regarded as an important aspect to success. And surely the tears that flowed down the cheeks of many souls, when they could not trace their names among the successful applicants for courses at MUK, confirmed the need and desire that these young people had to be part of this greatest institution of learning.


Education in Uganda is really becoming expensive. The government now focuses mainly on sponsoring science courses, leaving few places for arts oriented courses. This has therefore led to the majority being subjected to private sponsorship. Even then, the university recently decreased the private admissions by 3000 from the previous academic year, citing cases for producing quality education. One who has qualified for attaining higher education at such a great institution should have the almighty to thank. Many would have wished to be part of this institution but have not managed due to a variety of reasons.

Juliet Nakazi, who is one of those set to join the university, said she was really overwhelmed and that she could not wait for the semester to commence. She really wants to feel what campus is, gauging on what she has already heard. And so many are like her. Having been schooling in an environment of stress, consisting of too much reading under pressure and other hurdles commonly found in secondary schools, the university should provide some relief. Or so they think.

In actual sense, life at Makerere is no different from secondary, only that at university, no one is there to chase you to go to class, or to turn out the lights. Everyone is in control of his or her own life. And this is where one has to take caution not to be taken advantage of in this “free” life at the university.

The parents are more than worried about their “innocent” souls children being left on their won. They know that now their kids are exposed to the gates of temptations, and surely they are right to be worried. But parents’ hearts should not sink and they should value the tuition they pay for their children. I am very sure that every parent or guardian will have had something inspiring to pass on to their children, as they prepare to fight yet another battle. And with such advice as the ABC strategy, this battle should once again be defeated as the ones before it.

By Lambert Rusoke
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First published: September 16, 2005
Lambert Rusoke is a student at Makerere University Business School.
rlamptey2003@yahoo.com.